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Summer in a bottle – gorgeous golden pinks from Provence and surprises from further afield

5 Jul

In a midsummer made for pink wine drinking, the Wine Wanderers have challenged themselves to reconsider roses made outside the South of France.   It was a wrench; it’s hard to turn away from the beautiful golden-pink wines which characterise Cotes de Provence and have a quality mostly absent from pinks made elsewhere.  It’s what Jean-Michel Deluc, former head sommelier of the Paris Ritz, speaking of the Clos de l’Ours CdP he sells through Le Petit Ballon, so aptly describes as “a stony minerality”.

 
Our prejudice against deeper-pink wines which often lack any hint of minerality has been fed over the years by some horrid Rose d’Anjou and even nastier “blush” zinfandel first encountered when the Wanderers lived in California.   It was a shock to return to these shores and find that white zinfandel had followed us – but we were close enough to France to pick up endless five-euro bottles of Cotes de Provence in French supermarkets which never disappointed, despite the bargain basement price.

 
CdP has now made it on to UK supermarket shelves, riding the crest of a wave of Brits’ preference for pale pink roses, but costs twice as much here as it does in France, thanks to the duty.   The Wanderers enjoyed Laithwaite’s gorgeous golden-pink Domaine Les Gres(£10.99 or £9.89 if buying 12) but felt it was a bit pricey.    At least both Sainsburys and Waitrose, whose own label CdP’s are decent value on promotion if also pricey otherwise at £8-9, have ramped up their range of pinks in light of sales of tens of million bottles every year and made some good finds elsewhere.

 
It’s not only in Provence where a preponderance of grenache makes for a great drop. Having established on a visit to Langedoc-Roussillon how good winemakers there are at blending this grape with syrah(viz. the excellent value L’Or du Sud by Foncalieu, £5.49 at Lidl), we ventured further north, enjoying a £6 Winemaker’s Selection Cotes de Rhone from Sainsburys, which also blends grenache with Syrah.  Ditto an £8  Barrihuela Rioja Rosado – here the grenache is spelled garnacha – perhaps a little finer than the excellent value £4.99 Rioja rosado from Lidl.

 
Laithwaites’ Pillastro Rosato from Puglia presented the first challenge to our prejudiced palates, not only because it was a slightly suspect strawberry pink, but because the grape was primitivo, the progenitor of zinfandel.   While not as sweet and nasty as the “blush” zinfandel we used to drink in California, the Pillastro was still too jammy for our taste, and a reminder that primitivo/zinfandel does have an inherent sweetness which is subsumed by the alcohol when it appears as a joyous red.    Similarly, we love red pinot noir, but not the New World pink pinot noirs tasted from various sources – a bit sweet and a bit fizzy for our tastebuds.

 
Specially worth mentioning is a great rose from Greece we approached with anticipation, remembering a wonderful cheap as chips rose enjoyed with barbecued pork in a remote corner of Mykonos.   Twin Sails, a Waitrose exclusive, is made from the xinomavro grape, another variety usually reserved for reds but this one performing perfectly as a fragrant pink with not a hint of unwanted sweetness.   Fabulous value at an everyday price of £5.99, all you should really have to pay for a wine that looks and tastes like summer in a bottle.

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Pukka primitivo and other Puglian delights

16 Aug

The Wine Wanderers finally got to Puglia this summer, where we were expecting extraordinary food from the home of burrata, that luscious form of mozzarella stuffed with fresh cream, and capocollo, a wonderful cut of cured pork neck little seen outside the region,  but rather ordinary wine.   For decades Puglia has been Italy’s wine barrel, sending millions of gallons of red to other parts of the country to enrich their blends, and marketing some rather indifferent primitivo, the same grape as the Wanderers’ beloved zinfandel.

In the flesh, though, it was a different story.   Back-Roads Touring ferried us by mini-bus between some highly authentic restaurants serving up a decent drop with food which exceeded our wildest expectations – italy’s finest antipasti on plates piled high not only with burrata and capocollo, but stuffed vegetables and rarefied dishes not seen elsewhere like the ubiquitous mashed broad been dip – Puglian hummus! –  served with wild local bitter greens.

While we drank our favourite bottles in restaurants not on the tour – Terranima in Bari, which showed us how great Puglian primitivo could be in a bottle of Petrigiovani and Coco Pazzo in Martina Franca, where we discovered Puglia can do decent white too in a luscious La Voliera fiano, we have Back-Roads to thank for a visit to Azienda Castel di Salve, a winery with British heritage which makes wonderful, incredibly well-priced wines with the region’s indigenous grapes.

Surprisingly, our favourites from this vineyard were not primitivo, but the delicious Santimedici Rosato, a rose made from negroamaro, and Priante – a blend of 50 per cent negroamaro and 50 per cent montepulciano  – rich and voluptuous.     The quaffability a big dollop of montepulciano can bring to the wines of this region is a trick not lost on Waitrose, whose Rich and Intense Italian Red NV Puglia is a blend of 20 per cent montepulciano, 30 per cent primitivo and 50 per cent nero di troia, fine value at £4.99

Laithwaites are fielding their own interesting primitivo blends, unusually mixing it  in their Tenuto di Somaro with the aglianico found in this region as well as in neighbouring Basilicata.  Their  La Fonte d’Oro, in which Primitivo meets the often tough and difficult negroamaro, is simply voluptuous.  They are also importing a Puglian grape we never saw on the ground – a ssusumaniello, which was pleasant enough but not nearly as interesting the two aforementioned blends.

Of the Puglians available on the high street, there is a marked difference in quality, not surprising given how much indifferent primitivo gets on to the market.  While the Palastri we tasted from Sainsburys seemed thin and bland, the supermarket’s flagship Taste The Difference Primitivo del Salento yielded all the warm voluptuousness of the best primitivos the Wanderers tasted in situ and much better value at £6 on promotion than the £6.50 Palastri.    As rich and amazing as anything we drank in Puglia is the award-winning Villa Magna Primitivo di Mandoria, £10 from M&S and worth every penny, a close runner-up the Terre di Faiano organic Primitivo del Salento exclusive to Waitrose for £9.49,

As this tour also took us back to Matera, the urban jewel of neighbouring Basilicata, with its famous urban caves teetering down the hillside, the Wanderers also decided to taste the a

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Coco Pazzo, Martina Franca

glianicos associated with this region which are available on the high street; this lesser-known grape deserves a wider audience.   Sainsburys TTD version from the foot of the dramatically-named Mount Vulture is smooth, elegant and very fair value at £8 a bottle, and the £10 Messapi from M&S simply glorious.

Visit http://backroadstouring.com/ for details of their next trip to Puglia coming up in October; being ferried by mini-bus is a better idea than a hire car when you have two-hour lunches with wine to look forward to every day!

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Puglian fava bean “hummus” at Coco Pazzo